Is heel pain stopping you from training?


Fascia

English: X-ray of the heelbone with plantar fa...

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Although the fascia is invested with countless sturdy ‘cables’ of connective tissue called collagen fibers, it is certainly not immune to injury. In fact, about 5 to 10% of all athletic injuries are inflammations of the fascia, an incidence rate that in the United States would produce about a million cases of plantar fasciitis per year, just among runners and joggers. Track and field, tennis players, volleyball players, step aerobics participants, and dancers are also prone to plantar problems, as are non athletic people who spend a lot of time on their feet or suddenly become active after a long period of lethargy. A recent study found that over 50% of people who suffer from plantar fasciitis are on their feet nearly all day. Plantar Fasciitis usually develops gradually. Heel pain may only occur when taking the first steps after getting out of bed or when taking the first steps after sitting for a long period. If the plantar fascia ligament is not rested, the inflammation and heel pain will get worse. Other conditions or aggravating factors, such as the repetitive stress of walking, standing, running, or jumping, will give to the inflammation and pain. In some cases, the inflamed ligament may not heal because many people who have plantar fasciitis do not completely stop the aggravating activity.

In athletes, a number of factors are associated with development of plantar fasciitis. These factors can lead the athlete to change his or her gait (the way the feet strike the ground), which can cause symptoms and injury. Risk factors for athletes include:

  • Bio-mechanical¬†factors, such as decreased flexibility in the foot and ankle, imbalances in muscle strength (muscles in one leg or foot are weaker than the other), abnormal foot mechanics (when stepping down), and tightness in the Achilles tendon.
  • The repetitive nature of sports activities and improper training.
  • Rapidly increasing the numbers of miles run.
  • Running on steep hills.
  • Wearing Track shoes that are worn out.
  • Wearing Track shoes that do not have a cushioned sole or enough arch support.
  • Abruptly changing the intensity or duration of the running routine.

The traditional remedies for plantar fasciitis include stretching the calf, massaging, decreasing one’s training, losing weight, purchasing better fitting shoes (with a raised heel and arch support), icing the sore heel, and taking ibuprofen.

Another treatment option, also known as one of the easiest, is using heel seats in your shoes. Heel seats pick up and re-stretch the plantar fascia, redistribute the heels natural fat pad, provide structural reinforcement to the foot, and apply acute pressure to relieve the pain while your feet heal.

In any case, when you feel pain, your body is trying to warn you that something is wrong. See a doctor or specialist at the first sign of pain. Treating problems early is the key to a healthy lifestyle.

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2 thoughts on “Is heel pain stopping you from training?

  1. I totally agree; I used to have heel pain all the time – especially during kung-fu – but it stopped when I started to stretch my ankle more thoroughly. Great post and I look forward to sharing more with you:))

  2. Pingback: New Plantar Fasciitis Treatment Could Relieve Foot Condition « eastpennfoot

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